Am I eating too much beef?

photo credit | gourmetmetrics

Hanger steak braised in a tomato / wine reduction with steamed potatoes. Tender, flavorful, omnivores delight. That generous pound (500g) lasted us two nights and was delicious. But then I got to thinking. It’s been an important week for climate change because of an international conference in Glasgow, Scotland this week. Beef production does have an impact on green house gases, perhaps not to the extent that vegan activists would have us believe, but enough to be a cause for concern for me. Anyway, I got curious and that’s when I decided to run the numbers on our beef consumption.

Having recently moved to New York’s Hudson valley, I’m privileged now to be able to buy locally raised grass fed beef directly from the farm. The meat I buy there is expensive, about double the price for a comparable cut of commodity supermarket beef. Americans love their beef and if we ate beef a couple times a week I couldn’t afford the luxury. But we’ve never been big meat eaters so I’m okay with with the upfront cost. Besides when ever possible, I like to support local agriculture.

Now my challenge was to find a reference point for assessing “too much beef”. I settled on a report from the World Resources Institute, a Washington DC based think tank with the admirable mission of moving human society to live in ways that protect Earth’s environment and its capacity to provide for the needs of current & future generations. The report, 6 Pressing Questions About Beef and Climate Change, makes the case that if ruminant meat consumption were limiting to 55 calories per day per person, it would nearly eliminate the need for additional agricultural expansion.

My braised hanger steak made 4 meals and each serving weighed about 100 grams (3.5 ounces)  / 275 calories. By American standards, that’s a pretty small portion. As referenced above I’ve never made meat the center of the plate because I enjoy so many other foods. A couple steamed potatoes, several dollops of that tomato based pan sauce, and a robust serving of broccoli raab filled up the rest of the plate. A satisfying, tasty, and well balanced meal .

But going back to the numbers, for argument sake, let’s say I cooked beef once a week and used the same serving size. That would be 275 calories divided by 7 or an average of 40 calories per day. Since we’re not big beef eaters however, it’s more likely we would only have beef once a month. This month we’ve eaten beef twice (two days of braised hanger steak) so our monthly total is 550 or an average of 18 calories from beef per day per person.

If an average of 55 calories per day per person is a good goal, we’re doing spectacularly well.

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